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My name is Brooklynne. 20. Northern California. I'm a writer, actress, dancer, and sometimes I do art things.

blasianxbri:

niggawillyoushutthefuckup:

theculturedactivist:

Open your eyes.

New age Genocide 

reblogging again


unclefather:

you want a man with a strong jawline so you have a sturdy place to sit


frankoceanfanclub:

unfrickable:

ok but robin williams is about to get infinitely more support than the child who was just gunned down by police and this makes me so sad

you do realize human beings are capable of caring about more than one thing right


prussianinamerica:

I had a teacher who refused to let any of us say “its okay” because of this exact reason.

prussianinamerica:

I had a teacher who refused to let any of us say “its okay” because of this exact reason.


nickhelmer:

flowury:

please do yourself a favor and date the biggest fckn nerd u can get ur hands on

My fiance fully annotated a copy of Hamlet. Because she’s a nerd.

I should feel more embarrassed about this.


teachthemhowtothink:

thesubversiveatheist:

academicatheism:

Children Exposed To Religion Have Difficulty Distinguishing Fact From Fiction, Study Finds
Young children who are exposed to religion have a hard time differentiating between fact and fiction, according to a new study published in the July issue of Cognitive Science.
Researchers presented 5- and 6-year-old children from both public and parochial schools with three different types of stories — religious, fantastical and realistic –- in an effort to gauge how well they could identify narratives with impossible elements as fictional.
The study found that, of the 66 participants, children who went to church or were enrolled in a parochial school were significantly less able than secular children to identify supernatural elements, such as talking animals, as fictional.
By relating seemingly impossible religious events achieved through divine intervention (e.g., Jesus transforming water into wine) to fictional narratives, religious children would more heavily rely on religion to justify their false categorizations.
“In both studies, [children exposed to religion] were less likely to judge the characters in the fantastical stories as pretend, and in line with this equivocation, they made more appeals to reality and fewer appeals to impossibility than did secular children,” the study concluded.
Refuting previous hypotheses claiming that children are “born believers,” the authors suggest that “religious teaching, especially exposure to miracle stories, leads children to a more generic receptivity toward the impossible, that is, a more wide-ranging acceptance that the impossible can happen in defiance of ordinary causal relations.”
According to 2013-2014 Gallup data, roughly 83 percent of Americans report a religious affiliation, and an even larger group — 86 percent — believe in God.
More than a quarter of Americans, 28 percent, also believe the Bible is the actual word of God and should be taken literally, while another 47 percent say the Bible is the inspired word of God.

Oh, gee, look at how shocked I am.

Filed under: Why I’m a Secular Parent #738.

teachthemhowtothink:

thesubversiveatheist:

academicatheism:

Children Exposed To Religion Have Difficulty Distinguishing Fact From Fiction, Study Finds

Young children who are exposed to religion have a hard time differentiating between fact and fiction, according to a new study published in the July issue of Cognitive Science.

Researchers presented 5- and 6-year-old children from both public and parochial schools with three different types of stories — religious, fantastical and realistic –- in an effort to gauge how well they could identify narratives with impossible elements as fictional.

The study found that, of the 66 participants, children who went to church or were enrolled in a parochial school were significantly less able than secular children to identify supernatural elements, such as talking animals, as fictional.

By relating seemingly impossible religious events achieved through divine intervention (e.g., Jesus transforming water into wine) to fictional narratives, religious children would more heavily rely on religion to justify their false categorizations.

“In both studies, [children exposed to religion] were less likely to judge the characters in the fantastical stories as pretend, and in line with this equivocation, they made more appeals to reality and fewer appeals to impossibility than did secular children,” the study concluded.

Refuting previous hypotheses claiming that children are “born believers,” the authors suggest that “religious teaching, especially exposure to miracle stories, leads children to a more generic receptivity toward the impossible, that is, a more wide-ranging acceptance that the impossible can happen in defiance of ordinary causal relations.”

According to 2013-2014 Gallup data, roughly 83 percent of Americans report a religious affiliation, and an even larger group — 86 percent — believe in God.

More than a quarter of Americans, 28 percent, also believe the Bible is the actual word of God and should be taken literally, while another 47 percent say the Bible is the inspired word of God.

Oh, gee, look at how shocked I am.

Filed under: Why I’m a Secular Parent #738.


nivalingreenhow:

when McGonagall finds out that Ginny is pregnant, and that the Weasley and Potter bloodlines will converge, she marks on her calender the day the child will turn 11 and that is the day she retires 


paris666hilton:

jerkidiot:

my mom always throws old clothes that she has nothing to do with in my closet, and whenever i call her out on it, she says “i have never done that, all of the clothes in your closet are yours”

image

are you sure mom

image

are you sure these are my clothes

or you just raided your mom’s closet and made up this post for notes?image


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